1. ohscience:

more starch granules inside banana cells. The cells are stained with iodine to show the starch.

coooooooooooooool!

    ohscience:

    more starch granules inside banana cells. The cells are stained with iodine to show the starch.

    coooooooooooooool!

  2. ohscience:

mantis shrimp
from wikipedia:
Called “sea locusts” by ancient Assyrians, “prawn killers” in Australia and now sometimes referred to as “thumb splitters” — because of the animal’s ability to inflict painful gashes if handled incautiously — mantis shrimp sport powerful claws that they use to attack and kill prey by spearing, stunning or dismemberment. Although it happens rarely, some larger species of mantis shrimp are capable of breaking through aquarium glass with a single strike from this weapon.

    ohscience:

    mantis shrimp

    from wikipedia:

    Called “sea locusts” by ancient Assyrians, “prawn killers” in Australia and now sometimes referred to as “thumb splitters” — because of the animal’s ability to inflict painful gashes if handled incautiously — mantis shrimp sport powerful claws that they use to attack and kill prey by spearing, stunning or dismemberment. Although it happens rarely, some larger species of mantis shrimp are capable of breaking through aquarium glass with a single strike from this weapon.

  3. ohscience:

A macrophage of a mouse forming two processes to phagocytize two smaller particles, possibly pathogens. 
(from wikipedia)

    ohscience:

    A macrophage of a mouse forming two processes to phagocytize two smaller particles, possibly pathogens. 

    (from wikipedia)

  4. unknownskywalker:

Scientists take first step towards creating ‘inorganic life’
Scientists at the University of Glasgow say they have taken their first tentative steps towards creating ‘life’ from inorganic chemicals potentially defining the new area of ‘inorganic biology’. Professor Lee Cronin and his team have demonstrated a new way of making inorganic-chemical-cells or iCHELLS.
All life on earth is based on organic biology (i.e. carbon in the form of amino acids, nucleotides, and sugars etc) but the inorganic world is considered to be inanimate. The research is part of a project to demonstrate that inorganic chemical compounds are capable of self-replicating and evolving. You could call it “inorganic biology.”
The cells can be compartmentalised by creating internal membranes that control the passage of materials and energy through them, meaning several chemical processes can be isolated within the same cell – just like biological cells. The researchers say the cells, which can also store electricity, could potentially be used in all sorts of applications in medicine, as sensors or to confine chemical reactions.
The grand aim is to construct complex chemical cells with life-like properties that could explain how life emerged and also use this approach to define a new technology based upon evolution in the material world – a kind of inorganic living technology.
If successful this would give us some incredible insights into evolution and show that it’s not just a biological process. It would also mean that we would have proven that non carbon-based life could exist and totally redefine our ideas of design.

    unknownskywalker:

    Scientists take first step towards creating ‘inorganic life’

    Scientists at the University of Glasgow say they have taken their first tentative steps towards creating ‘life’ from inorganic chemicals potentially defining the new area of ‘inorganic biology’. Professor Lee Cronin and his team have demonstrated a new way of making inorganic-chemical-cells or iCHELLS.

    All life on earth is based on organic biology (i.e. carbon in the form of amino acids, nucleotides, and sugars etc) but the inorganic world is considered to be inanimate. The research is part of a project to demonstrate that inorganic chemical compounds are capable of self-replicating and evolving. You could call it “inorganic biology.”

    The cells can be compartmentalised by creating internal membranes that control the passage of materials and energy through them, meaning several chemical processes can be isolated within the same cell – just like biological cells. The researchers say the cells, which can also store electricity, could potentially be used in all sorts of applications in medicine, as sensors or to confine chemical reactions.

    The grand aim is to construct complex chemical cells with life-like properties that could explain how life emerged and also use this approach to define a new technology based upon evolution in the material world – a kind of inorganic living technology.

    If successful this would give us some incredible insights into evolution and show that it’s not just a biological process. It would also mean that we would have proven that non carbon-based life could exist and totally redefine our ideas of design.

  5. ohscience:

The three-day-old Nephasoma pellucidum larva (peanut worm larva) shows its muscles in neon green, cell nuclei in blue, digestive system in red, and the cilia that give it mobility in blue.
Image: Michael J. Boyle
(submission from downtohades)

    ohscience:

    The three-day-old Nephasoma pellucidum larva (peanut worm larva) shows its muscles in neon green, cell nuclei in blue, digestive system in red, and the cilia that give it mobility in blue.

    Image: Michael J. Boyle

    (submission from downtohades)

  6. ➞ The dinosaur that died in its tracks

    Polish paleontologists have reported a surprising fossil first - a Protoceratops dinosaur that apparently died in its own tracks about 80 million years ago in Mongolia. Footprints are some of the only fossils that show us how dinosaurs and other long-extinct animals behaved when they were alive. But animals are rarely fossilised together with their final footprints.

    (Source: ohyeahdevelopmentalbiology)

  7. microculture:

    Suzanne Lee: Grow your own clothes

    Designer Suzanne Lee shares her experiments in growing a kombucha-based material that can be used like fabric or vegetable leather to make clothing. The process is fascinating, the results are beautiful (though there’s still one minor drawback …) and the potential is simply stunning.

    This is amazing

  8. There’s something completely entrancing about sharks leaping out of the water.

    There’s something completely entrancing about sharks leaping out of the water.

    (via fuckyeahdeadthings)

  9. ohscience:

circulation in the hand

    ohscience:

    circulation in the hand